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Luke Skywalker engages in a lightsaber duel with his father, Darth Vader, aboard the Death Star, where the emperor tried and failed to convince the Jedi Knight to turn to the dark side of the Force. In the end, Vader betrays and kills the Emperor, sacrificing his own life in the process. Some fans believe this is the fulfillment of the ancient Jedi prophecy of the Chosen One who would bring balance to the Force.


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Not all of it was blown into powder, and some of it probably is still flying through space or has crash landed on one of the poor planets that got in the way. Is this location Endor? But some human-made constructs have fallen to earth , including sky labs and space shuttles and its surprising how much of those pieces remained intact. In developing The Force Awakens , J. Abrams designed a sequence where Rey would dive underwater to loot from the remnants of the Death Star, which had crash-landed and was submerged in the ocean on a planet.

While the details have never come to light, I think the original plan was for her to find something, a MacGuffin of sorts, that sends her off on this adventure. Returning to this location hints that possible secrets from the Empire could be part of the core of this story.

Four Years Later, Star Wars Fan Isn't Done With His Death Star II Diorama

The novel, written by authors who deftly created the MedStar duology and outdid themselves, in my opinion and their own individual accomplishments remember the stunning Shadow Hunter by Reaves or the amazing Shadows of the Empire by Perry? And they named it "Death Star"? Hm, I think a better title would be: "Bored Star".

Even the second act, much more action packed than the first, could not save the book. Very poor entry into the Star Wars world. I would not recommend. View 1 comment. Aug 01, Phil Elmore rated it it was amazing. That's an important distinction, and may explain why fans of Perry and Reaves collaborations or of Steve Perry and Michael Reaves individually will enjoy the novel immensely, but Star Wars fanboys may be dissatisfied.

The book is, in fact, an absorbing character study of a handful of Death Star by Michael Reaves and Steve Perry is not a Star Wars novel that just happens to be written by Reaves and Perry -- it's a novel by Reaves and Perry that just happens to be set in the Star Wars universe. The book is, in fact, an absorbing character study of a handful of ordinary people stationed on the Death Star just prior to its completion -- a TIE fighter pilot, a conscripted architect, a battle-weary surgeon who is a character from a previous work by the same authors , a storm trooper who is also a martial arts expert, etcetera.

We watch as each of these men and women and several others come to terms with their rationalizations for serving the Empire. As the Death Star begins taking millions of lives, each of these characters is forced to make a decision about the future. The Death Star is a setting, not a central plot point, and thus it is dealt with only in passing though we do get a better picture of what such a large station would actually contain.

There are a few interesting passages elaborating on the relationship between Darth Vader and Grand Moff Tarkin, which is not quite as two-dimensional or as clear-cut in terms of authority as it might appear in Episode IV. Of particular interest to me was the subplot involving the chief gunner aboard the Death Star, a loyal Imperial trooper who, eager to fire "the big gun," realizes to his horror that he has become a killer of planets after the Death Star goes operational.

A few of the other characters will seem eerily familiar -- particularly a cantina owner and her loyal security man -- to anyone who has read Steve Perry's work starting with The Man Who Never Missed. The prison-planet setting in which the novel opens is particularly familiar ground for Reaves and Perry, who collaborated on the excellent The Omega Cage which is about a prison break from a bleak, futuristic penitentiary on an inhospitable world.

Towards the end of the novel, scenes are taken verbatim from Episode IV and woven into the tales of the various characters, in some cases amplified slightly as we hear the thoughts of those involved. Given that any fan of Star Wars knows how the novel must end, it's no mean trick that the reader will still be curious to see how this novel ends. I enjoyed Death Star immensely and would recommend it to both those who enjoy work in this genre, but to fans of Reaves and Perry especially.

Jun 04, C. Phipps rated it it was ok Shelves: star-wars. My opinion on this book is It's weird because this book shouldn't matter to me since it was part of the Legends universe and a minor tie-in. However, the very premise of the book really just gets my gourd as an author. It's a book which is born from the conversation between Dante and Randal in Clerks.

It's about the wrong Death Star but the premise is the same: "What about all the dudes on the Death Star who didn't deserve to be blown up whe My opinion on this book is It's about the wrong Death Star but the premise is the same: "What about all the dudes on the Death Star who didn't deserve to be blown up when Luke Skywalker dropped his torpedo down its thermal exhaust port?

Well, the answer to that question was IN Clerks as they had a guy talk about how your politics is going to influence your job anyway. If you're going to take a job working for the Empire on their doomsday weapon then maybe you should note it's dangerous. Both for you and the nameless billions who perished on Alderaan and a planet called Despayre it turns out.

Next, the fact this question is being asked is reducing Star Wars' conception of war to an even more childish level than a series made for children ages Because, goodness knows, good people might get HURT in war when planets are on the line. This book is basically a story about a bunch of nice people on the Death Star who get caught up in the war. It's the ending, though, which bothers me. It's so tonally dissonant and completely wrong-headed I literally had to restrain myself from throwing the book. The only time I've ever had to do that was with Kevin J. Anderson's Dune prequels. What bothered me?

What drove me to such anger? Warning - it's a spoiler for the book. You have been warned. Yes, they all escape at the end during the Battle of Yavin.

Star Wars: Why Does the Empire Keep Building Death Stars?

What the Force? You mean to tell me, you wrote a book about humanizing all the nameless cogs in the Empire's ultimate death machine and then you had them NOT DIE during the climax? I mean, what's the point of doing the book if you're going to do that? I mean, it negates everything! The writing isn't bad, I guess, and it has my favorite appearance of Admiral Daala in the franchise but I just don't understand what was going through the writers' heads.

Jan 13, Carl Alves rated it really liked it. The novel centers around the construction of the original Death Star. Grand Moff Tarkin shares the stage along with Darth Vader as the main villains in the novel. Vader is involved periferally at first before taking the main stage. The book starts with the introduction of an eclectic group of characters including the owner of a cantina, an escaped prisoner, and a fighter pilot Death Star was an enjoyable tale that was sort of prequel, but also ran concurrently to Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope.

The book starts with the introduction of an eclectic group of characters including the owner of a cantina, an escaped prisoner, and a fighter pilot. Their lives run concurrently, and for a time, it didn't readily appear how they were going to figure in the outcome, but eventually their story lines melded. I enjoyed the weaving in of these new characters and a new storyline into the existing plot of A New Hope. It was pretty seamless and the backstory added depth to the story. On top of that, I found the writing to be very professional and competent.

Star Wars - Death Star I Suite (Theme)

If you enjoy sci-fi and Star Wars, then this is something that you will want to read. Carl Alves - author of Blood Street This book finally sheds some light on the discussion from "Clerks". What about all the innocents on the Death Star? This book follows a selection of people who all end up on the Death Star - civilian contractors, prisoners, conscripted staff, soldiers, etc. It wasn't a bad book by any means but it was nothing illuminating either. It was interesting to see what was going on around scenes from "A New Ho This book finally sheds some light on the discussion from "Clerks".

It was interesting to see what was going on around scenes from "A New Hope" but it needed something more. The quality of Star Wars novels has really dropped these last couple years. Feb 10, Angel rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Star Wars fans and readers. Finally finished it. It is a pretty quick read. It is also pretty well written. The book is basically the story of the construction of the Death Star. It is divided in two parts: the construction and then the shakedown cruise, which leads to the events in the first Star Wars film most people have seen by now.

I usually dislike books where I know the ending beforehand, but this book was actually interesting and engaging.

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The first part where the station is constructed and the characters are intro Finally finished it. The first part where the station is constructed and the characters are introduced is actually pretty good. Different people from diverse backgrounds come together in constructing the Death Star. In the second part, we see some cameos from characters we knew in the film, but we get a different point of view, and that makes the book a good read as well. The book features the character of Doctor Divini, which regular readers of Star Wars novels may recognize from the Medstar Duology by the way, I read those two book, and they are on my list.

Another character is a librarian, which for a librarian as me, was kind of cool too. Overall, this was a good and pleasant read. Dec 06, Donald rated it it was ok Recommends it for: only die-hard Star Wars fans. Star Wars books have increasingly become more sci-fi than sci-fantasy, going into more detail about the technical aspects of the universe than focusing on the larger-than-life stories based on myths that they should have.

Now we have a story about how a "technological terror" was constructed, which goes on an on about how big the Death Star is, how it was made, what parts weren't working, what needed to be changed, blah blah blah. There are some new characters that are introduced and whom we fol Star Wars books have increasingly become more sci-fi than sci-fantasy, going into more detail about the technical aspects of the universe than focusing on the larger-than-life stories based on myths that they should have.

There are some new characters that are introduced and whom we follow to see if they make it off the station in time since we know exactly how this turns out , but I wasn't all that interested in them by the time it was important. There are some interesting views of some classic scenes from the first Star Wars film, a lot of the time from someone else's viewpoint, that are sort of fun, but the last third-to-quarter of the book is almost a re-hash of the first film and since we've seen that movie, there's no mystery or suspense as to what's going to happen.

Nov 07, Moses Operandi rated it really liked it. This book was fresh and enjoyable, with interesting characters and a nail-biter ending. At the beginning, it was rather hard to follow. The book was written in short sections, generally no more than three pages long and usually less, following the story of one character.

This jumping from character to character was rather daunting, but I stuck to it, and it was worth it. Of course, the good thing about an ensemble-cast setup is that you get to watch each particular story develop until they all c This book was fresh and enjoyable, with interesting characters and a nail-biter ending. Of course, the good thing about an ensemble-cast setup is that you get to watch each particular story develop until they all crash head on. I haven't read many books in that style, but I have to say I enjoy it.

Of course, this was a Star Wars book, and I know that's not really a compliment in the world of fiction. Just a theory, but I think that when authors restrain themselves to a certain universe, as opposed to a genre, the creative juices flow more easily. And, geez, other genres don't feature Darth Vader as one of the star characters, and call me a 90s-holdover Sci-Fi nerd, but Darth Vader rocks! Feb 05, Stephen Kibler rated it did not like it. One expects that any Star Wars novel is going to be complete crap, and this one doesn't disappoint. Yet, this is a book that I have wanted to exist since I was a kid.

The scene in Star Wars where the Stormtroopers are standing around chatting gave us a glimpse into their everyday lives -- and I wanted more. This book delivers, as we delve into the lives of regular folk who work on the Death Star. These people have ancillary contact with the main characters as the events of the Star Wars movie unf One expects that any Star Wars novel is going to be complete crap, and this one doesn't disappoint. These people have ancillary contact with the main characters as the events of the Star Wars movie unfolds.

View all 3 comments. Apr 11, Jacen rated it did not like it Shelves: star-wars-novels-i-own. Here it is the nutshell: No real clear and tight plot until the last third. Far too much character set up for a one shot novel. I'd have understood this much character stuff if it were part of a series. It all came together in the last third. It's a fun, exiting and emotional ending actually but not worth the hard earned time getting there. There are so many better EU novels than this one.

Move along. I'll give you two guesses at this book's subject, and that's only if you even need the second one. On the one hand, the book has a dull title that evokes nothing other than its subject; on the other hand, at least it's not as riduculous as The Starcave of ThonBoka. Even the one-word titles -- Kenobi, Tarkin, and Thrawn -- suggest more than this book's title does. The book is better than its title suggests.

Reaves and Perry create a wide, diverse cast of characters, all of whom are involved with t I'll give you two guesses at this book's subject, and that's only if you even need the second one. Reaves and Perry create a wide, diverse cast of characters, all of whom are involved with the construction of the Death Star. We begin a good way into its construction, and since the book was written after the end of Revenge of the Sith, the story follows from what was established in the prequels, while also tapping into the events from Star Wars.

The authors do a good job of placing the story firmly in between, bridging the gap between the two stories. Because the story butts up against Star Wars, we have a few characters who are already familiar to us -- Darth Vader and Wilhuff Tarkin being the biggest. It's impossible to escape having them be a part of the story, and the authors do a good job of characterizing them appropriately Tarkin comes across as even more ruthless , but there seemed to be a strong vein of fan service, too.

I was all set to give the book four stars, because the book succeeds in telling a decent story while giving us additional background into the Expanded Universe, but then the authors had to go and make the ending melodramatic and pat at the same time. There were also moments in the story where you could have put money on who wasn't going to make it out alive. I've started to notice that when an author creates a character who has so much to lose, there's a good chance they're goners.

Death Star is a good read. If the authors had handled the ending differently, I would recommend it as one of the stronger EU novels, but as it is, it merely rises to the top of the mediocre books. Aug 25, Alana rated it really liked it Shelves: political , star-wars-legends , sci-fi , in-a-series. I enjoyed it, but I'm a big Star Wars nerd. If you're not into Star Wars, it won't be that interesting for you. It expands on the universe and characters already in the Legends, as well as incorporating newer information from the prequels although I could have done without the midi-chlorian bits.

It was fun to see the construction and ultimate destruction of the ultimate weapon from the eyes of the "bad guys" and from the "little guys," and we get both perspectives nicely. There's a little poli I enjoyed it, but I'm a big Star Wars nerd. There's a little political pondering, meaning-of-life musing, and some good old action sequences. Good fun. A benevolent but inept king was as bad as a despot. This book really exceeded my expectations. Being a Star Wars book, I was interested enough to pick it up, but given that it appeared to focus on the story of an inanimate battle station, and a story which has been covered before by A New Hope , I approached it with the expectation that it would not be up there with the best books of the Star Wars saga.

In addition, critics had condemned it as boring, slow and too long. Assuredly, it did take a couple of chapters to get into. The protagonists, our This book really exceeded my expectations. The protagonists, our "ordinary beings", were new, so they needed to be introduced and given a little while for the reader to care about them.

This took up the first six chapters, and it was a little disjointed, jumping from one new character to the next in order to get all the introductions done. However, once this part was over and done with, the plot starts to move along at a steady pace. Once you get to this stage, the book becomes a real page turner. The big names appear where appropriate, and oversee events throughout — Motti, Daala, Tarkin and Darth Vader — but they do not overshadow the book.

The stars of this show are our nine ordinary guys — plus of course, the Death Star itself. This speaks of the quality of this collaboration of authors, that they have made brief encounters with these highly familiar characters, exciting and new again. The ordinary characters do strike you as quintessentially ordinary, yet each of them has a unique backstory, finely tuned personality, and their own reasons for being on the Death Star. I sort of sensed that the individual strands would come together in the end, but despite that, the story was still engaging.

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Another criticism that was levelled at this book was that the ending was boring — a tiresome retelling of the original, Episode IV: A New Hope film, except from a different point of view. After reading it myself, I feel this is an unfair criticism. The reappearance of film scenes are few in number, and built up a steadily increasing pressure all the way to the end — will our protagonists make it off the Death Star before Luke drops a proton torpedo into its reactor core?

In addition, I thought these scenes were great because it showed that new characters could interact with an established story and still get away with the whole thing being plausible as canon.

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Such a scene would have been fantastic. Nevertheless, the writing is high quality, the pacing perfect, and the characters detailed and realistic. Sep 24, Adam Bourke rated it really liked it Shelves: science-fiction , star-wars , not-owned. This is unusual for a Star Wars book, or any book really, in that all of the characters are on the bad guys side. This is a book about people who work for the empire, and it gives us a unique insight into "the other side of the story". For a start, nearly all of the main characters are pretty good guys. One or two do a couple of illegal things, but then so did Han Solo.


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  7. None of them really want to kill This is unusual for a Star Wars book, or any book really, in that all of the characters are on the bad guys side. None of them really want to kill anyone either. Even the one who pulled the trigger on the big gun. It does give a new perspective to the Star Wars films.

    Many of the people on board the Death Star when the Rebels destroyed it were actually Civilians - running the cantinas and shops on the station. Which was designed in order to end all war Ok, so the Empire destroyed an inhabited planet. That's not so cool. But if the Rebels hadn't destroyed the Deathstar, then that war would probably have ended, amd the two future wars wouldn't have happened.

    The Empire would have brought peace to the Galaxy. While this book is on the side of "not killing people", it is perspective altering, and a truly unique book in the star wars saga. But this isn't an essay on who the good guys were during the Rebel Uprising, it's a review of a book. And as usual, I discuss the characters. At first I felt there was too many of them. As I continued reading, and got to know the characters a bit better, it felt better, but I still had to pause at the beginning of some chapters to remember who was who.

    But for the most part, they were all pretty well written. There narrative was pretty split between them, so there wasn't enough on each for them to become outstanding. Two characters stood out particularly to me. One was a new character "Ratua", who was a devious little guy, but one of my favourite characters. The other was Darth Vader. The way he was written was unlike any other book I've read about him in. He was in pain, and often recalled his lost wife or the horrorific event in which Obi-Wan Kenobi disfigured him.

    We see him having emotions, but he's still pretty intimidating. There's one particularly good scene where one of the characters considers not moving out of Vader's path. It's not a very eventful scene - they walk past each other, but it shows Vader in a clever way. As for the plot There's a saboteur on board - but it's an unresolved plotline, and barely mentioned.

    Most of the story takes place during the construction phases of the Death Star, so there's no real combat. But it's not really what the book is about - it's more about the people on board, the good people on board, and the ultimate goal of the Death Star as a deterrent. One other unresolved plot was that of another new character: Teela, a prisoner Architect. We know what happens to her at the end of the book, but initially on the Death Star she is working under a Master Architect, who often gives her tests.

    One test he gives her she has to think about, and he gives her till the next day. But then we don't hear about him again. In fact, she doesn't really do much architecture after a while, her main role being "love interest". The last thing I want to say about this book is that it isn't afraid of talking about the more intimate aspects of relationships.

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    It doesn't go into any detail, but it hints that more is happening behind the scenes - something that many Star Wars books tend to avoid, pretending instead that the most that happens in relationships is a kiss every now and again. It was refreshing to see it here, although it's also been occurring in some of the later Fate of the Jedi books. Overall, I enjoyed the book. It wasn't an incredible story, but the characters were good. I was a little disappointed with the ending, I felt it was too neat. But the thing I enjoyed most was the chance to see events from the point of view of "the enemy".

    Han, Leia, Luke etc are good guys, but this book managed to make me sympathize with the Empire. It's definitely worth reading. Jan 12, Csenge rated it really liked it. I really enjoyed the first half of the book, then it got a little too predictable for a while, then it got very exciting for the end. The characters were very likable the ones that were supposed to be, anyway , and I loved the details behind the building of the Death Star, and all the various kinds of people that staffed it.

    It could have done with a little less re-telling of New Hope, but it had a new enough perspective to keep it interesting. Also, it was interesting to read it right after wa I really enjoyed the first half of the book, then it got a little too predictable for a while, then it got very exciting for the end. Also, it was interesting to read it right after watching Rogue One.

    Apr 21, Darryl Dobbs rated it it was amazing. I was starting to believe that I may never read a good Star Wars book again. The Clone Wars novels were so enjoyable that they are a tough act to follow. The Old Republic books were also very good. So do the books involving the original Star Wars characters all suck? Death Star brought me back on board. What an awesome novel. I loved this story. It describes everything in and around the Death Star in the final stages of its creation. Every question you ever had about the Death Star I was starting to believe that I may never read a good Star Wars book again.

    Every question you ever had about the Death Star is answered here. How did they build a space station the size of a moon? How does it get designed? How do they feed everyone on board? What do the inhabitants do for entertainment? Michael Reaves and Steve Perry did a wonderful job of telling us all about this.

    And towards the end of the book, it tied directly into the movie — but from the perspective of others. Just a high recommend from me. So much about the Star Wars canon is revealed here, and so much is tied together. This book is one of those rarities where I like the book despite it being of two different worlds. Though this book was good, the book is completely two-faced, going from cringingly bad to ecstatically good. I am guessing these good parts were handled by Steve Perry and the bad parts were chucked out by Michael Reeves.

    The good is the Imperial side. Tarkin, Daala, Motti and some newbies like Vil Dance were great! Also, the details on the small things about the Death Star apparently, they have R This book is one of those rarities where I like the book despite it being of two different worlds. Also, the details on the small things about the Death Star apparently, they have Roddenberry's "replicators" in galaxies far, far away.

    The bad? Two words: other characters. The characters not Imperial were horribly put together, especially Ratua "I am Groot! Oh, my. And this character Teela Kaarz. Her secret? Picture a blast door. Other than that, the novel gets a pass. I think there were a lot of problems but there was a lot of good to trump it. Four stars. There's an extent to which I enjoyed the extended galaxy literature of Star Wars more when I was young.

    That was possibly because I just loved Star Wars, and wasn't as much concerned with a good story or good writing. Now older, and a bit more cynical, I entered this book with hesitation, but I was pleasantly surprised. Despite my enjoyment of the book, there were two primary problems I found as I read it. At first as I was reading it, I wished there was more focus on Tarkin and Vader as they see There's an extent to which I enjoyed the extended galaxy literature of Star Wars more when I was young.

    At first as I was reading it, I wished there was more focus on Tarkin and Vader as they seemed to be the most interesting characters of the book. As I approached the end, I realized that wasn't the problem. Instead, I wish the main characters had been fleshed out more and that Tarkin, Vader, Motti, and the canon Star Wars gang had been left out entirely.

    Tell more about the characters I'm actually supposed to care about and invest in, and less in the characters whose fates I already know. That brings me to problem number two: too many characters. By chapter 5, I'd been introduced to six characters already, and it took half the book to figure out who was who. Focusing on fewer characters, in my opinion, would've allowed more development of those characters and made me more invested in them.

    Some seemed to merely exist to continue the plot; that's not a problem, but then that character shouldn't get a few chapters all to themselves. Overall, it was fun to see another take or view on the events of Episode IV and preceding , but I felt like it could have been tightened up a bit more than it was.

    If you like Star Wars, you'll probably enjoy this book. If you couldn't care less about Star Wars, you may just find yourself confused and frustrated halfway through. Aug 08, Brandon Rooney rated it it was amazing. This book answers the long running question of whether or not Luke murdered millions of innocents when he launched that proton torpedo The novel follows the story lines of at least five different individuals, ranging from Imperial military staff to imprisoned criminals to regular citizens aboard the Death Star.

    The reader goes inside the minds of these characters, including the drive behind Grand Moff Tarkin's desire to make it the ultimate power in the universe. The characters are well develop This book answers the long running question of whether or not Luke murdered millions of innocents when he launched that proton torpedo The characters are well developed, putting the bulk of the interest on their lives and not so much on the Death Star and it's place in A New Hope. Even though there are sub-plots that tie directly into familiar scenes from the movie, they run independent of the film and carry their own significance in the novel.

    Death Star is not overloaded with the typical Star Wars mumbo jumbo. Very little is mentioned of the Force or of lightsabers, and I don't think Artoo made an appearance at all. The reader does get to see some new points of view, such as what happened to Leia in the cell block, and even how Vader approached gunning down the fighters that made the first run at the Death Star. Overall this is an excellent novel; the chapters were more like short bursts of conversations and interaction among the characters rather than long drawn out scenes.

    It explores the architectural problems and solutions to such an enormous project, how it was staffed and created into a moving city with it's own self contained populace, and how the initial use of the super laser affected the lives of so many. Feb 18, William rated it really liked it Shelves: star-wars , hardcover. Like James Cameron's movie "Titanic", you know how this book is going to end even before you begin reading, but that doesn't completely ruin the story as it moves towards that inevitable climax. In fact, I liked learning what the triggerman on Alderaan's death thought as he edged closer to the secret Rebel base and another million deaths on top of his conscience.

    Then there is the stormtrooper who chases Solo and Chewbacca through the bowels of the Death Star and his "error" in letting them escap Like James Cameron's movie "Titanic", you know how this book is going to end even before you begin reading, but that doesn't completely ruin the story as it moves towards that inevitable climax.

    Then there is the stormtrooper who chases Solo and Chewbacca through the bowels of the Death Star and his "error" in letting them escape.


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    Unfortunately, there are just a few too many characters here to get attached to all of them, and it leaves this novel feeling at times like it would have been better suited being written like "Tales from the Death Star" like other writers have done with Jabba's Palace and the Mos Eisley Cantina. I did however enjoy watching Vader squirm a bit as he foolishly made Kenobi "more powerful than [he could] possibly imagine". A decent read, nonetheless, for the fans who need that little extra "behind the scenes" feel of the destruction of the Empire's most powerful weapon. Apr 09, Jeremy Schoolfield rated it did not like it.

    It was so good, since then I've torn through about 60 SW-related books. If this had been the first SW novel I read, instead, I may never have picked up another one. It essentially answers the question from "Clerks": What about all those regular people on the Death Star. But it doesn't do so very well. Most of the time I wondered why I was even reading it, and that didn't change by the end. The best scenes are actually just retellings of the stuff from "A New Hope.

    There's a little about why that fateful exhaust port was put in place, but that's about it. Oh, and some lame, sophomoric attempts at political "commentary" re: our use of the atom bomb in WWII. Don't waste your time. Jun 02, Ryan Groesbeck rated it did not like it. Did NOT live up to the hype that surrounded it. I was expecting I don't know Tales of sabotage and rebel-hunting, etc.