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The interiors are always the same with every visit. Lincoln's bearded visage over time starts to become a pretty tedious stone representation of Lincoln's bearded visage. After a little more time, the monuments become background and are incapable of being seen at all, and then when you do revisit them, to try to see them again, they evoke very little in terms of inspiration or feeling.

Then what are they but artfully arranged stones? I understand their formal perfection. I understand their magisterial harmony. But I can't come back to them and keep digging things out of them with pleasure. After awhile they aren't elusive. Once their secrets are disclosed they immediately enter stasis.

I think Frank O'Hara is a better poet than T. I expect this will enrage a few people. But O'Hara's work possesses elements that I find fundamentally lacking in Eliot's: humorous melancholy, strange language that manages to stay alive beyond multiple readings, amateurishness which is important , willingness to sound ridiculous, or even superfluous at times, in the search of the oblique sentiment that is inexactly, perfectly human.

There is nothing superfluous in Eliot, and that is a flaw. O'Hara produced thousands of poems, on lunch breaks, on the subway, on walks, on napkins at restaurants, on postcards, probably on toilet paper. When I think of Eliot writing I think of him in a three-piece suit seated at a mahogany desk with a candle burning! And I am fully aware that he lived in an era of abundant electrical lighting!

This is a problem. Eliot is for the universities, and we needed him to exist, if for nothing else to write "The Wasteland" when the world needed "The Wasteland". But it's O'Hara's collected poems I keep by the bedside. View all 5 comments. Jul 26, Peycho Kanev rated it it was amazing Shelves: poetry. Critics of Eliot damn his work for its difficulties - and one cannot deny that its complicated diversions into technical and structural experimentation, mythical reference and multilingual commentary do initially intimidate.

The beauty of Eliot's poetry is that it grows with you. Eliot doesn't always succeed, and many of his poems seem trite and pretentious, but when he succeeds he hits dead on with poetry perfect in form, balance, and sound. There is the man here, the poet as reflected in his o Critics of Eliot damn his work for its difficulties - and one cannot deny that its complicated diversions into technical and structural experimentation, mythical reference and multilingual commentary do initially intimidate.

There is the man here, the poet as reflected in his own work, but there is also common human experience through looking at history "The Waste Land" and meditating on Man's relationship with the Divine and the eternal Ariel Poems, and most of his output after This collection is a wonderful summary of the poetic works of one of the major literary figures of the twentieth century.

View all 4 comments. While I love some of the poems, others I didn't care for at all. So it is hard to rate the book as a whole These poems were selected by Eliot himself just a few years before he died as the best of his work and it certainly contains all of his most famous work EXCEPT for the fact it doesn't even have one poem from "Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats". With that in mind, I cannot whole-heartedly recommend it as a single sole volume of Eliot's poetry.

I am not much of a modernist, so it is perh While I love some of the poems, others I didn't care for at all. I am not much of a modernist, so it is perhaps not surprising that I found many of the so-called "minor poems" more enjoyable than the more serious and to me often more obscure verses. My favorites: - The Love Song of J. I Lines to a Persian Cat - Landscapes esp. Mar 29, Safa Fatima rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , owned. This is the best poem collection I've ever read. After I was done reading it I was telling my mother, "It kills me. It kills me.

Eliot paints a picture so vivid you can't help but see it, it forms on its own, it penetrates your soul, it speaks to your mind, it fills your eyes. Eliot is what a poet ought to be, the complete embodiment. He reaches deep into you and pulls on your heart strings. He shows you what poetry can be, what it can do, how high it can reach. I just loved every, really ev This is the best poem collection I've ever read. I just loved every, really every, bit of this book and I know for sure I want to read it again.

Actually, I was a little melancholic reaching the end and I felt like I wanted to read more. It is a great great piece of art and if you haven't read Eliot, you don't know what you're missing. I appreciate T. Eliot as a influential and significant writer of classic literature. However, I find it difficult to understand the truest meaning of his words. Truthfully that is a fault of mine, but poetry has never been something I am drawn to. In saying that, I'm willing to look deeper into his poetry to better understand it.

Aug 22, April rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: avid poetry fans, everyone. Shelves: poetry , loved. His paradoxical nature has always both frustrated and delighted me for years, and I love him for it. I was fortunate enough to discover this book not long after, and have thoroughly enjoyed each moment spent with it. A five, in every way. View 1 comment. Apr 08, An Idler rated it it was amazing. They contain the core of his critique of modernism. Still, many I hadn't heard of, especially from his early output, fit into that same body of critique: Rhapsody on a Windy Night, Morning at the Window, etc.

The rest - the occasional verse, fragments, landscapes - interested me less. Eliot is difficult and obscure, and I'm the middlebrow reader he wanted to fence out. It's poetry that requires Close Reading, contemplation, and analysis. I often had to reference terms, foreign language phrases, and literary allusions; even after several reads I only marginally grasped the thrust of his meaning. I'm not saying it's too difficult or does not reward the effort, but it's not something to be taken lightly. A strong interest in Eliot's unique vision and what he had to say will help.

There are immediate rewards as well. Taken individually, the images seem nonsensical. Together, especially after multiple reads and struggling with the words at length, they combine into something you can feel, or taste, in an uncanny way like reality yet not something you can then describe to others. Chasing down the allusions and references will expand your learning. Eliot's poetry conveys by original idiom and forceful image a disgust, alienation, and despair with modernity that serves as a verse expression of the same distaste that Weaver expressed in the terms of Platonist philosophy.

Jul 04, James Murphy rated it it was amazing. I've spent my life reading Eliot. When I was a high school junior I had a teacher who turned me on to poetry. She showed me the truth in Sandburg, but I soon discovered Eliot on my own. A story I still love to tell is how I spent the summer of my 17th year walking around with a library copy of Eliot's poems under my arm.

A cousin asked me, "You're not reading that stuff, are you? Eliot has followed the arc of a man's reading life. A sun moving through a sky. From the boy walking summer with Eliot tucked under his arm to the much older man still reading for the umpteenth time, that volume now full of notes and underlinings indicating an understanding if not quite yet the understanding.

Collected Poems: 1909-1962

I'll keep coming back because I'll never be able to complete that understanding. Conrad Aiken famously said of The Waste Land that it succeeds because of its ambiguities. I think that's true. I think that each reader gets his own meaning from Eliot because he wrote the poetry everyone needs. Sooner of later you come to it. I know he gave me something I could carry with me my whole life.

George Oppen compilation of readings (from New Collected Poems)

It's lasted that long. As long as he can set me vibrating like a tuning fork I'll never become insensitive to his poetry. His work is comfort. It's the honey made in season that you have to taste and taste. View all 12 comments. Jan 05, Joe rated it it was amazing.

Way too much here for a real review, but I had to write something about the volume that's been my tattered, marked-up, much-loved companion for twelve years now. I feel Eliot's ache for transcendence, his paralyzing frustration at the limitations of language to communicate the depths of our souls. And yet he did it better than anyone ever has. It's intellectual, yes, but it's from an intellectual perpetually pushing across into the visceral, never quite unifying it all fully, and knowing that th Way too much here for a real review, but I had to write something about the volume that's been my tattered, marked-up, much-loved companion for twelve years now.

It's intellectual, yes, but it's from an intellectual perpetually pushing across into the visceral, never quite unifying it all fully, and knowing that the action itself, not the getting there, is the blessing. Less floridly, in general the most famous stuff is the best. The Four Quartets are my favorite poem s of all time, and Ash-Wednesday is nearly as good.

For some reason The Waste Land has never resonated deeply with me except in parts, though. Eliot was certainly a profound thinker and poet. Hollow Men remains the most solidified poetic experience that Eliot can give. Eliot is still in modernity, half recoiling in horror, half looking upward for salvation. Pound has already left - his salvation arrived in Greece. Jul 22, Brandon rated it really liked it. Eliot was the first poet that I was drawn to as I began my intellectual and artistic maturation.

I fell in love with them on first reading, and there is something about Eliot's style that is so affecting; he places words in an order that, from a more objective point of view is quite odd, but create such a vivid mood or atmosphere that you can't help but be moved. This is especially true of his later work, like the infamou Eliot was the first poet that I was drawn to as I began my intellectual and artistic maturation.

This is especially true of his later work, like the infamous "The Wasteland" and "The Four Quartets". I come back to Eliot, out of fondness for my first experiences with his work, but also out of a continuing insight I find there. His religious themes do not resonate with me as they would with other believers, but they do resonate with me in that they are evocative of a man searching for meaning amid post-industrial modernism, even as he is embracing modernist literary style.

Apr 29, Seth Woodley rated it really liked it Shelves: sojourn , default , poetry , fiction-lit. Alfred Prufrock. Nevertheless, it is nearly always evident that Eliot is a careful, master craftsman. He is a master of figurative language, and he has a clear depth of knowledge that he is able to weave into his works. It is somewhat difficult to rate a whole collection of poetry.

However, there are some excellent and wonderful poems in this collection. There are some that are not so great. There is a lot to learn and to enjoy in Eliot's writing. This is a nice volume to handle and to read but does not include Old Possum and it is also worth finding Eliot's four plays elsewhere. It is a slim collection for such a major poet but, for practical reasons, this is convenient. Some poets have such immense collections my heart sinks. Writing a review of T. Eliot's poetry would be ridiculous. Liking him, or rating his poems as good or memorable, is probably neither here not there.

Better for the reader to like them, I imagine, but not essential This is a nice volume to handle and to read but does not include Old Possum and it is also worth finding Eliot's four plays elsewhere. Better for the reader to like them, I imagine, but not essential. There is no good reason to agree with him - or not entirely. Reading Eliot - or to have read Eliot - is helpful also when reading any other poet.

I am not sure why one would read others without sooner or later reading him. And so each venture Is a new beginning, a raid on the inarticulate, With shabby equipment always deteriorating In the general mess of imprecision of feeling, Undisciplined squads of emotion. And what there is to conquer By strength and submission, has already been discovered Once or twice, or several times, by men whom one cannot hope To emulate - but there is no competition - There is only the fight to recover what has been lost And found and lost again and again: and now, under conditions That seem unpropitious.

But perhaps neither gain nor loss. For us, there is only the trying. The rest is not our business. This book lives on my nightstand. So, so perfect and infinitely interesting. Jul 22, Ali rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , books. What absolute joy and delight can be found in T.

Eliot's words! He will forever be one of my favorite poets and reading and re-reading his words brings such wonder to life. I can't say I get "The Wasteland" - no matter how many times I read it, that one still eludes me. But what encouragement can be found in "Choruses from The Rock" and the "Four Quartets" and what wonder can be captured by the lines from "Portrait of a Lady" - "And so you are going abroad; and when do you return? But that's a What absolute joy and delight can be found in T.

But that's a useless question. You hardly know when you are coming back, you will find so much to learn. I'm convinced there's at least one Eliot poem that can appeal to anyone, you just have to find the one that speaks to you. These are the poems I want to wallow in. Don't really know-- I have a mixed feeling about Eliot's poems. I found his Prufrock impenetrable, The Wasteland annoying, frustrating, and mostly incomprehensible, Ash Wednesday somewhat interesting in parts but too heavily religious. His The Hollow Men , however, resonated with me in all its haunting and chilling overtones.

Ariel Poems , Minor Poems , Unfinished Poems were all meh and can anyone explain to me what the hell's going on in his eerily Beckett-esque Sweeney's Agonistes?!?!? Four Qua Don't really know-- I have a mixed feeling about Eliot's poems. Four Quartets was quite interesting in its own light, but I wasn't exactly sure what he was trying to say or describe.

A lot of things do get lost on the first read and it is in the slower second read that we can hope to gain a deeper understanding. Poetry is different from fiction, and I'm still an amateur reader of the verse. The "Occasional Verse" section had some cool, charming poems, and let me quote a section from it: "The enduring is not a substitute for the transient.

Overall, Eliot's poems taught me how important it is to spend time with each poem and how difficult is to read poetry in general.

It seems the reader is looking for poems that best describe their "private experience at its greatest intensity," which means the reader blatantly reads meaning into the text who doesn't? Aug 04, Jacob Aitken added it. Good theology can be iconic. And being iconic it is poetic. It is an icon put in words.

It is like faithful hermeneutics. The Patristics were accused of Platonizing and allegorizing. Not so. Despite all their excesses, they saw better than the academic professor today that the Bible yearns to break through with new meaning and simple, surface level interpretations are not enough. Not to diminish literal interpretation, but not to exalt it either. Eliot is probably the supreme example of Good theology can be iconic.

Book Excerptise: T. S. Eliot : Collected Poems, - by Thomas Stearns Eliot

Eliot is probably the supreme example of a theo-poet. Indeed, his writing is iconic. It is indirect and perhaps jarring at first glance, but the awakened mind sees he reveals depth. Like the icon, we see in Eliot another dimension. Gilt cloth. Later impression of the first U. The copious ink annotations in the text are not in McMurtry's hand, but very clearly in the first owner's hand, in spite of claims made by several former owners of this copy. Edges worn, but good and sound, without dust jacket.

Collected Poems. Third Impression. Hardback with wrapper. Bottom margin of boards a little faded. Wrapper is partially sunned and a little chipped and worn. Seller: Addyman Books. Collected Poems, Eliot, T. Second printing. Original blue boards, corners bumped, in edgeworn DJ. First Edition. True First British Edition. Board margins are a little dulled, head and tail of spine slightly frayed and board extremities worn. Prize bookplate to front pastedown. Some pencil annotation to contents and light foxing to endpapers.

Wrapper is sunned to spine and quite worn and slightly chipped at extremities, lacking small portion from head of spine slightly affecting text, and has been completely reinforced internally with publisher's paper. Collected Poems, T. Very Good. Blue cloth, gilt. A trifle rubbed but a nice copy. No inscriptions. Top corner of f. Top edge red. Internally clean with no marks.. Edition: 1st edition. Seller: Brimstones Published: Edition: 1st Edition. First U. Endsheets darkened, cloth faded at spine and edges, else a good copy in rather worn and chipped dust jacket.

New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company. Vintage Copy. Book condition is Very Good, with a Very Good dust jacket. Edgewear to jacket, including few bumps, small chips, and short tears. Light staining and toning to jacket, especially at spine. Edgewear to boards, including a few bumps at spine.

Previous owner name to front end page.


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Text is clean and unmarked. No date: Copyright pages has as most recent date, however circa London: Faber And Faber Ltd.. Fair with no dust jacket. This book has hardback covers. In poor condition, suitable as a reading copy. Please note the Image in this listing is a stock photo and may not match the covers of the actual item,grams, ISBN:.

Seller: Anybook Ltd Published: Dust Jacket in fair condition.

ISBN 13: 9780571055494

Re-bound by library. Water damaged but text remains legible.

Seller: Anybook Ltd. Palgrave MacMillan, Near Fine book in a Near Fine dust jacket. Book condition is Very Good; with a Very Good- dust jacket. Toning and a few small smudges to jacket. Minor edge wear to jacket, including a few short tears. Owner inscription to front end page. Collected Poems of T. New York: Harcourt Brace, Harcourt, Brace and Co, Statde First American Edition. In blue cloth. Dulling to titles on spine. No jacket. Seller: Jay W. Used - Good. Ships from the UK. Former Library book. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside.

Your purchase also supports literacy charities. Lacks title page. List of 'books by same author' are same as the first edition. No date. Fading to spine and covers. Corners of boards and head and tail of spine a little bumped. Front paste down is a little damaged with rubbing. Corners of pages a little rubbed. Seller: Fireside Bookshop Condition: Good. Ex-library,With usual stamps and markings,In fair condition, suitable as a study copy.

No dust jacket. Early printing. Black cloth, gilt-stamped spine title. Spine ends and corners rubbed, very good lacking the dustwrapper. Misg front endpaper. Pg 43 there is ink marginal writing. Cloth bound book. First edition with no mention of later printings. Dust jacket is in two pieces and tucked inside book, but largely intact.

Collected Poems Eliot,T. Black cloth. Harcourt, Brace and Company. Hardcover, printing of a copyright; fading and shelf wear to exte rior; corners bumped; moisture stain at bottom edge of back cover; otherwis e contents in good condition with clean text. Eliot Harcourt, Brace,, Used, very good. Nice older printing of the original edition. Black cloth hardcover without dust jacket, Harcourt Brace, printing. Only slight wear, upper right tip of front free endpaper clipped, no marks or writing.

Page edges not quite pristine. Very nice reading copy. Seller: Brentwood Books Published: Condition: Used, very good. Later Printing. A Near Fine copy in Good dust jacket. Blach cloth in printed dj.