Guide From Douglass to Duvalier: U.S. African Americans, Haiti, and Pan Americanism, 1870-1964

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U.S. African Americans, Haiti, and Pan Americanism, 1870-1964

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For the mind, as a meaning-making entity, is forever attempting to refashion the various levels of reality that come within its purview. This is evident at least in the ten stylistically varied prints that ten mostly New York-based artists, who happen to be of Haitian, Cuban, Dominican, Nevisian and Mexican backgrounds, have contributed to the fund-raising effort. All in all, this serious, historically important collection of prints—contextually a rarity, indeed—intimates that the struggle and suffering of the Haitian nation is not just surmountable but pregnant with philosophical relevance and possibilities.

By Tequila Minsky from www. She then quoted local teacher, artist, and poet, Michele Voltaire in answering the question she asks herself, what is she doing? As a way to defy darkness, misery and fear, violence, treacheries, delusions. And what goodness and wonder and rebellion I have to share is my art.

In a world filled with headlines of disasters and fear, we need to turn to art for a place to nourish the heart and soul. So against darkness and in haste, I write to share my light. Haiti Cultural Exchange was founded to develop and present the cultural expressions of Haitian people and is endeavoring to provide platforms for artists to share their light. Their monthly salons offer a more intimate experience with the creative artist and spirit. On Nov. The ah-ha moment is in seeing how she brings the very distant past into the future.

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